Life’s Lessons


Looking back at Thanksgiving

I roasted Cornish hens for our Thanksgiving meal. I had done this once before about 50 years ago. I don’t remember how well those first ones turned out, but these did very well. Add baked sweet potatoes, another vegetable, and a salad, and it was a good meal.

The next evening I hosted my family at a local restaurant for our Christmas dinner. Everyone had a good time. I don’t think it was as rowdy as in some years past, but maybe the kids, now in their thirties, are growing up, too. As usual, our gift exchange was new toys to be donated to a mission in Kentucky.

First though, on Thanksgiving morning, we participated in a six-hour sale to get a new TV. Even there, customers were more thoughtful of each other than I’ve seen at some Black Friday sales.

On Friday morning, a friend came over to install the TV with its hook-up to the receiving box and all that stuff I don’t understand. While he was here, I told him how nice his new arrangement at the store is. How welcoming. With a grin that nearly split his face, he said, “Thank you! That’s just what I was going for!” Mentioning that observation truly made his day! Such a small thing to do.

While here, he told me about his family Thanksgiving dinner, which he hosted this year. It was his first time cooking and carving a turkey. But feeling he could handle it alright, he undertook the task.

The turkey was done to perfection and he set it on the counter for carving.

Standing at the counter, his feet slightly apart, braced for the job, tools in hand, he began the carving. He soon had the breast separated and split in halves.

However, at this point, his tools slipped and half the breast fell to the floor. He could probably salvage it, rinse it off and have the full breast to serve.

But he felt a nudge between his solidly planted feet. Very quick to react, his golden retriever appropriated that half turkey breast for his own Thanksgiving dinner. My friend didn’t see fit to share the details of his “conversation” with the golden retriever.

That laughable tale will no doubt follow the family for many Thanksgivings to come. The golden retriever had his own Thanksgiving dinner and the family had theirs – minus half the turkey breast. One of those little things that make family get-togethers memorable.

At this kick-off to the holiday season, let’s be alert for the experiences that make it unique and memorable – those Kodak moments, whether actually captured in picture or not.

Let’s also be aware of the meaning of the seasons – Thanksgiving rooted in our nation’s history and the Christmas season rooted in God’s gift to us – His very own Son who came to live as mankind and then to die on the cross for our sins.

Give thanks. Rejoice in the coming of our Savior and trust Him fully for salvation.

Looking back at Thanksgiving